Here are 11 steps being taken by Burnley Council to help tackle climate change

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Burnley Council is celebrating its progress on taking climate actions to reduce its carbon footprint.

The authority approved its climate change strategy in 2022, which sets out a potential timeline for climate actions to become a net zero council by 2050 at the latest. Its latest report by climate change officer Claire Graham is set to go to the council’s executive today for approval.

The council says it has made good progress against the actions set out in the strategy.

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What does this include?

Wildflowers, including golden marguerite (Cota tinctoria), common poppy (Papaver rhoeas) and sea mayweed (Tripleurospermum maritimum), grow on a strip of land. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)Wildflowers, including golden marguerite (Cota tinctoria), common poppy (Papaver rhoeas) and sea mayweed (Tripleurospermum maritimum), grow on a strip of land. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Wildflowers, including golden marguerite (Cota tinctoria), common poppy (Papaver rhoeas) and sea mayweed (Tripleurospermum maritimum), grow on a strip of land. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

- Carrying out in-depth heat decarbonisation plans across the largest 10 operational buildings, looking at how best to reduce emissions for these buildings and make them more energy-efficient;

- Increasing the number of electric vehicle charging points across the borough;

- In partnership with Burnley Leisure & Culture, the council secured £400,000 over the next four years from the National Lottery Climate Action Fund to help develop activities with volunteers and community groups with a focus on climate and environmental action, such as tree planting and meadow creation;

- Created 15 urban woodlands, one in each ward, in which volunteers planted 7,500 woodland trees. This autumn, the council will work with voluntary groups to create new wildflower areas in Scott, Queens, Thompson, Memorial and Ightenhill Parks;

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A bumblebee sucks nectar from a wildflower growing on a strip of land. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)A bumblebee sucks nectar from a wildflower growing on a strip of land. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
A bumblebee sucks nectar from a wildflower growing on a strip of land. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

- 50 large specimen trees have been planted in areas of the borough that have very few trees using a grant of £66,000 from the Forestry Commission’s Urban Tree Challenge Fund, with a further 50 trees to be planted in the autumn;

- Establishing the Our Journey to Net Zero council webpage www.burnley.gov.uk/net-zero which highlights some of the actions the council has taken to reduce its carbon footprint and offers simple ways for residents to save money and protect their local environment;

- Working with partners to consider the feasibility of geothermal mine energy schemes;

- Becoming the first council in Lancashire, and only the fifth in the UK, to achieve the Silver Carbon Literate Organisation award;

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What further work will the council take over the next 12 months?

- Working with partners to promote climate change activity and increase engagement with young people and the business sector;

- Ongoing work to achieve the Gold Carbon Literate Organisation award;

- Incorporating additional emissions into the council’s carbon budget.

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