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Study: Burnley locals would flog family heirloom for average of £281.14

The threshold to part with their family treasures in Burnley is amongst the lowest in the UK.
The threshold to part with their family treasures in Burnley is amongst the lowest in the UK.
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'Keep it in the family' is clearly an aphorism not favoured by Burnley locals, with a new study revealing that locals would sell a family heirloom for just £281.14.

The survey, carried out by vintage jewellery retailer, William May, has revealed that while the average price at which people would sell a precious heirloom across the North West is £363.21, in Burnley the threshold is over £80 lower.

Over 50% of Brits would not feel guilty about hocking those ancient earrings or that hand-crafted artisinal tea cosy so preciously coveted by your great-great granny, while nearly one in three would do so without even checking with their loved ones first.

"It’s perhaps no real surprise that when there’s a choice between having cash in your hand to spend on something useful, or having an old object just sitting around," said a spokesperson from William May. "People would rather make money off a family heirloom.

"However, certain things, like jewellery, can of course still be used and re-purposed – gems can be reset, rings can be resized – to hopefully be enjoyed by a new generation," they added. "And vintage jewellery is very fashionable!"

Across the country, the compensation necessary to part with such sentimental objects is £441.76, and while Burnley's cash-focused outlook on heirlooms is notable, they still have a ways to go to match the Welsh, who would part with their generational treasures for an average of just £279.84 - the lowest amount in the UK.

At the other end of the spectrum, Northern Ireland natives prize their nick-nacks far more highly, requiring £595.33 to say goodbye to their dusty old artefacts. And with 44% of sentimental Brits admitting that they have considered investing in a piece of jewellery so that it may be passed down as an heirloom, it appears Belfast may be the place to do it to keep it in the family.