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‘Everton should be banging down Dyche’s door’

Jamie Carragher
Jamie Carragher
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Sky Sports pundit Jamie Carragher believes Everton should be “bursting the door down” to make Sean Dyche their new manager.

Dyche has been linked with the post since the Toffees dispensed with Ronald Koeman just over four weeks ago, but speculation suggesting an official approach was imminent at the end of October has proved just that.

Dyche is currently fourth favourite for the post, and Carragher wonders if the outside perception of Dyche’s style of play has put the Goodison Park heirarchy off: “The results Sean Dyche has had since he went to Burnley, I don’t think any manager in world football – and I am being deadly serious – could get them any higher.

“You think of the size of the club, the money he’s spent, the players he’s got.

“They are actually part of a top seven at the moment. I don’t think they’ll be seventh at the end of the season, but the job he’s done has been unbelievable.

“I’m not sitting here criticising Sean Dyche for his style of play. I have no problem with it, and I love the way people play different ways in the Premier League.

“But there’s no doubt that top teams are put off if a manager gets a tag, rightly or wrongly, for playing direct football.

“Everton should be bursting his door down with the results he’s getting, but they’re not.”

Carragher pointed to the previous appointment of Roberto Martinez at Everton: “I go back to Roberto Martinez getting the Everton job. And this was an Everton that were fifth at the time. Wigan had won the FA Cup but they’d just been relegated.

“Martinez got the job on the back of the way of his teams played. He was also interviewed for the Liverpool job on the back of that. Brendan Rodgers got the Liverpool job on the way his teams played.

“There’s nothing between those three. So why will Dyche not get that kind of job?

“It’s a big thing for any manager going into their first job. How do you stay in the game as a manager? You have to get results and survive.

“Then you’ve got to decide how you do that, and that might be by being very pragmatic. But if you then get that tag of being a long-ball manager, you’ll struggle to get top jobs. It’s a very fine balancing act.”