Burnley boss Sean Dyche not looking to reinvent the wheel during enforced break

Sean Dyche isn't looking to fix what isn't broken over the continued absence from Premier League football.

Thursday, 23rd April 2020, 9:50 am
Updated Thursday, 23rd April 2020, 9:52 am
Sean Dyche

Burnley went into lockdown unbeaten in seven league games, 10th in the table, with Dyche having just been named manager of the month for February.

It is now six weeks since the Clarets' last outing, the 1-1 draw at home to Tottenham Hotspur, around the length of time clubs would usually have to decompress and look at how to move forward between the end of a season and return to pre-season training.

But Dyche isn't over-thinking the enforced break, looking to reinvent the wheel.

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He has spoken to his staff and players throughout, but he won't make too many changes upon the resumption of the game: "It's strange, because it is like a pause in the season, we were in good form, in good shape, we were delivering good performances, decent performances, so you want to pick up and carry on, but equally use the time to reflect on what we do.

"Usually that would be at the end of the season, we'd have a meeting, discuss what we thought, we'd make notes, decide different things we thought would be important moving forward, but because this pause situation is slightly different, sometimes the hardest thing to do is change nothing.

"You've got so many views, people saying you've got to change this and that, sometimes it's best to stay steady and believe in what you're doing.

"We were in good shape, so we want to pick up from that.

"The players know how we work, accept how we work and enjoy the challenge that comes from that, so catching up with staff has been more about social chats, making sure they and their families are well, throw a few ideas around, planning, and getting some feedback from the players as well.

"That's going to be important, because we trust our players - where are you emotionally and with what's going on? Do you understand it?

"Make sure the health and well being is in place so we can focus on the football."

The break has created a difficult situation in terms of finance right across the world, and Clarets chairman Mike Garlick laid out the worst case scenario that if this season doesn't resume, the club could be looking at a £50m loss - with other clubs potentially losing double that.

However, the club continue for the moment to pay casual staff, and Garlick admitted there were no immediate plans for wage cuts or deferrals.

The club is one of the better run in the Premier League, in terms of prudent planning, and Dyche said: "We are in a different shape ourselves to a lot of Premier League clubs in the sense it's been run very, very balanced financially over a number of years now, so we have got a strong situation financially, so therefore we can take more time with decisions being made from the chairman.

"The first decision was to not furlough, and the second decision is we're not having to do anything at this moment in time.

"That may change, but at this moment there's nothing to be done other than doing the right things from the players and staff, and all staff."

Garlick admitted the club could run out of money by August should football not resume by then, which led some national media to declare Burnley could go bust.

That is not the case, and Dyche added: "I think the simple thing is, everyone had a very quick reaction to what was said, and everyone came quickly on top of football, and I think he said this could be the worst case situation.

"Since then he has retracted a few bits of the things he'd said, I think everyone had that kneejerk reaction to that situation, and when you look at the facts and figures, we are in a very healthy financial position, the chairman wanted to do the right thing by not furloughing and looking at people still in place, looking after them.

"When it calmed down, everyone went 'ok, let's take stock and let it unfold a little bit' but I think it was a reaction to the news that everyone suddenly starts putting pressure on everyone to start taking cuts."