Restoration of Clitheroe Library clock plaque

An important historical marker, the library clock plaque, has been restored in Clitheroe.

Members of Clitheroe Civic Society with librarian Chris Jewett, second left, and local historian Steve Ragnall, far right.
Members of Clitheroe Civic Society with librarian Chris Jewett, second left, and local historian Steve Ragnall, far right.

A major landmark since 1905, the Clitheroe Library clock has told the time for generations of the townsfolk.

The clock itself has a fascinating history but the plaque attached to the casing of the mechanism in the upper room of the library has been unreadable for many years. Now thanks to Clitheroe Civic Society it has been restored and its story revealed.

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The clock was donated by a local mill-owning family to commemorate the loss of two brothers in the sinking of an ocean liner, “Drummond Castle”, off Brittany. This terrible tragedy, that saw the deaths of 242 people, led to the erection of a famous lighthouse.

Recently, a large group was firstly given a fascinating tour of the library by librarian Chris Jowett before local historian Steve Ragnall gave a short address. The conserved plaque was then unveiled by the Rev. Andrew Froud.

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Heritage Open Days in Clitheroe and surrounding Ribble Valley

Clitheroe Civic Society is committed to the history and future of Clitheroe. Details of its programme of events and how you can be involved can be found on its website.

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A Youtube film entitled "Clitheroe Library Clock and its Curious Connections" by Steve Ragnall tells the full story.

The clock was presented to the borough of Clitheroe by Edward Mercer Whipp, James Mercer Whipp and John Thomas Whipp in memory of their brothers Frederick Walker Whipp and Walter Walker Whipp who were drowned in the wreck of the Drummond Castle off Ushant in June, 1896.