More than 10,000 ambulance workers vote to strike over unsafe staffing levels and pay in England and Wales

More than 10,000 ambulance workers have voted to strike across nine trusts in England and Wales, increasing the threat of widespread industrial action in the NHS before Christmas.

Which trusts will be affected?

The GMB said its members working as paramedics, emergency care assistants, call handlers and other staff are set to walk out in the following trusts: South West Ambulance Service, South East Coast Ambulance Service,

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

North West Ambulance Service, South Central Ambulance Service, North East Ambulance Service, East Midlands Ambulance Service, West Midlands Ambulance Service, Welsh Ambulance Service and Yorkshire Ambulance Service.

More than 10,000 ambulance workers have voted to strike across nine trusts in England and Wales

Why have members voted to strike?

The GMB said workers across the ambulance services and some NHS trusts have voted to strike over the Government’s four per cent pay award, which it described as another “massive real-terms pay cut”.

The union will meet with reps in the coming days to discuss potential strike dates before Christmas.

What did GMB say?

The GMB said workers across the ambulance services and some NHS trusts have voted to strike over the Government’s four per cent pay award

Rachel Harrison, GMB national secretary, said: “Ambulance workers – like other NHS workers – are on their knees.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

“Demoralised and downtrodden, they’ve faced 12 years of Conservative cuts to the service and their pay packets, fought on the front line of a global pandemic and now face the worst cost-of-living crisis in a generation.

“No-one in the NHS takes strike action lightly – today shows just how desperate they are.

“This is as much about unsafe staffing levels and patient safety as it is about pay.”

The union will meet with reps in the coming days to discuss potential strike dates before Christmas
Hide Ad
Hide Ad
Read More
Footage shows chaos at Blackpool Victoria Hospital as 14 ambulances queue outsid...

She added: “A third of GMB ambulance workers think delays they’ve been involved with have led to the death of a patient.

“Something has to change or the service as we know it will collapse.

“GMB calls on the Government to avoid a winter of NHS strikes by negotiating a pay award that these workers deserve.”

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

The strike comes after Unison, the UK’s biggest trade union, announced thousands of ambulance workers intended to strike before Christmas.

Unison announced on Tuesday that thousands of 999 call handlers, ambulance technicians, paramedics and their colleagues working for ambulance services in the North East, North West, London, Yorkshire and the South West ​are to be called out on strike over pay and staffing levels after voting in favour of industrial action.

What did Unison say?

The union’s general secretary, Christina McAnea, said: “The decision to ​take action and lose a day’s pay is always a tough call. It’s especially challenging for those whose jobs involve caring and saving lives.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

“But thousands of ambulance staff and their NHS colleagues know delays won’t lessen, nor waiting times reduce, until the Government acts on wages. That’s why they’ve taken the difficult decision to strike.

“Patients will always come first and emergency cover will be available during any strike but, unless NHS pay and staffing get fixed, services and care will continue to decline.”

Health and Social Care Secretary Steve Barclay said: “I’m hugely grateful for the hard work and dedication of NHS staff and deeply regret some will be taking industrial action – which is in nobody’s best interests as we approach a challenging winter.

“Our economic circumstances mean unions’ demands are not affordable – each additional 1% pay rise for all staff on the Agenda for Change contract would cost around £700 million a year.

Hide Ad
Hide Ad

“We’ve prioritised the NHS with record funding and accepted the independent pay review body recommendations in full to give over one million NHS workers a pay rise of at least £1,400 this year, with those on the lowest salaries receiving an increase of up to 9.3%.

“This is on top of 3% last year when public sector pay was frozen and wider government support with the cost of living.

“Our priority is keeping patients safe during any strikes and the NHS has tried and tested plans to minimise disruption and ensure emergency services continue to operate.

“My door remains open to discuss with the unions ways we can make the NHS a better place to work.”