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Hollies record for new song at Nelson’s ACE Centre

ACE Centre manager Sean Lawler, studio manager Andrea Quarin and Bobby Elliott from the Hollies present the poster to mark the recording of new material in the recording studio.

ACE Centre manager Sean Lawler, studio manager Andrea Quarin and Bobby Elliott from the Hollies present the poster to mark the recording of new material in the recording studio.

 

The Hollies – the pop group formed in 1963 with strong links to Pendle – are still recording new material.

And when it came to choosing a studio to record a drum track for a new song, local composer/producer Steve Lee Vickers and the group’s drummer Bobby Elliott looked no further than the ACE Centre in Nelson and its resident engineer Andrea Quarin.

Bobby, from Roughlee, and guitarist Tony Hicks, originally from Nelson, are still with the group which was formed in 1963.

They had a string of hits including “The Air That I Breathe”, “Carrie Anne”, “Jennifer Eccles”, “Bus Stop” and arguably their most famous single “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother”.

Steve said: “Here in Nelson we have a great facility and engineer Andrea is a pleasure to work with – a real pro.

“We will hopefully record here again and will certainly recommend ACE studios to our friends in the music industry.”

The pair were at the ACE Centre on Tuesday, where Bobby presented a signed, limited edition, framed Hollies poster (Live at the Royal Albert Hall), with a personal hand written note.

Steve said: “He wanted to say something to encourage young local talent, based on his immense experience and knowledge of all things pop and rock. This is his heartfelt way of encouraging the evolution and development of future generations of musicians, singers and artists,” said Steve.

The note reads: “To the budding talent of Burnley and Pendle ...

“Established in 1963, we have been performing all over the world, every single year, for over 50 years.

“The Hollies helped to shape the world of pop and rock. We had more hits than the Beatles in the 1960s and 70s.

“Tony Hicks is from Nelson, and I’m from Pike Hill and Roughlee. If we can do it – so can you!”

Bobby said: “Over the years, our area has been blessed with an array of talented musicians and artists.

“In an ideal world, The ACE Centre could be the focal point where like-thinking creative local youngsters can meet and develop ideas.”

 

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