Freak injury puts brakes on Singleton’s comeback

Shayne Singleton lands a punch on Sam Eggington in his last fight. Photo: Kelvin Stuttard
Shayne Singleton lands a punch on Sam Eggington in his last fight. Photo: Kelvin Stuttard

Shayne Singleton has been forced to pull the plug on his comeback fight after suffering an injury in training.

After learning that British and WBA Continental super lightweight title contender Stevie Williams would be his opponent at Preston Guild Hall on October 3rd, the 26-year-old sustained a broken eye socket in a sparring session.

Singleton (20-1-0), looking to bounce back from his first professional setback – losing his WBC International Silver strap to Sam Eggington in March – was trading punches with English welterweight champion Adam Little at coach Karl Ince’s base in Inskip and was caught with an uppercut late in the fourth round.

“I’d probably won all four rounds,” said Singleton. “He was a back foot, side on fighter who didn’t really cause me any problems. I was just beating him with my jab and work rate. But then I got in too close and got caught. I didn’t think it was anything serious. I wasn’t in any pain.”

Singleton’s eye closed up, and he travelled to Airedale where he was diagnosed with a broken eye socket.

With his right eye ball having been dislodged, Singleton was transferred to Bradford Royal Infirmary.

“I’m devastated,” he said. “I’ve put in 12 hard weeks in preparation and it has been brutal. Everything was going to plan, but now this has happened.

“I won’t fight again until next year now. I feel sick because I’ve grafted for nothing.

“There’s no income, no reward for my efforts, and that’s the worst bit. My comeback has been full of ups and downs, I’ve overcome several injuries, but this has finished it off.”

Shayne thanks sponsors Ross’s Roofing, Pendle Narrowboats, Clearly Interiors, Muscle Meat and Josephine and James from Wellocks.

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