Would be Burnley FC manager Sean Dyche ‘not the finished article’

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BY his own admission, Sean Dyche is not “the finished article with all the answers.”

But you get the sense he is relentlessly searching for those answers.

The 41-year-old has not sat idly since ruthlessly being replaced as Watford boss by the Pozzo family, who installed Gianfranco Zola at Vicarage Road.

He has continued to learn his trade, and taken some pointers from an old friend in Stuart Pearce.

The pair came through the ranks together at Nottingham Forest under Brian Clough, and Dyche came on board with the England Under 21 set-up last month to continue to absorb training methods and ideas.

He said: “When you are in a job, sometimes you can get so into it that you forget what’s going on in the wider world.

“It’s nice to have a little window to go and reflect and look at others, share stories and practices and get a visual on it.

“When I went into work and Watford and you’re in the coaching circles you speak to a lot of other coaches to help in your own development.

“It’s all part of the learning curve.

“I’m still a young coach-manager, so by no means do I think I’m the finished article with all the answers. I’m not sure anyone is.”

That sort of attitude and willingness to learn his craft will have impressed the Burnley board, among other parts of his CV.

A journeyman centre back, Dyche spent most of his career at Chesterfield, while also enjoying time with Bristol City, Luton Town, Millwall, Northampton Town and Watford, where he played between 2002-05.

He returned to the club in 2007 as youth team coach in 2007, was named as boss Malky Mackay’s assistant in 2009, before taking the job outright when Mackay departed for Cardiff last summer.

Last season, he guided the Hornets to an 11th-place finish in the Championship, their highest placing in four years, and their total of 64 was more than the club achieved under Mackay’s management.

However, he was harshly cast aside when the Pozzo family took over.

Dyche has maintained his profile within football with appearances on Sky’s Soccer Saturday show, while assessing his options.

But the Burnley board - while admiring his leadership qualities and enthusiasm, will also have noted the success of the academy at Watford, which he played a role after getting on the coaching ladder.

The club have brought over 50 players through the academy into the first team, including the likes of Ashley Young, Marvin Sordell and Adrian Mariappa - all sold for seven-figure fees.

And the club boasts such success, despite competing against all of London’s Premier League clubs, including near neighbours Arsenal and Tottenham Hotspur.

Indeed, Watford train at University College London’s London Colney ground, which Arsenal left for a new facility next door.

A similar challenge faces Dyche at Burnley, where they are on the doorstep of the Manchester and Liverpool clubs, Wigan, Bolton and Blackburn, while looking to bring more players through the ranks in times of austerity, and the impending Financial Fair Play.