Closing toilets is a retrograde step

Exterior of the public toilets at Colne Bus Station - they have been closed as part of a cost-saving exercise.
Exterior of the public toilets at Colne Bus Station - they have been closed as part of a cost-saving exercise.

I write in reference to the closure of public conveniences in the town and also at Ball Grove Leisure Park.

I am finding it increasingly hard to understand the logic of our esteemed councillors in pressing on with these closures. It is a truly retrograde step in a town which prides itself on being forward-thinking and keen to encourage both traders and visitors to enjoy the facilities of the area.

A letter last week outlined the steps a family may have to take in the absence of a toilet facility and how high on the list of priorities such facilities play when visiting an area especially for children, the elderly and the disabled.

The suggestion in recent newspaper reports has been that people should avail themselves of toilets in shops and stores. Will the small trader in Colne centre welcome with open arms a stream of families requiring baby changing facilities and hand washing/drying facilities or a wheelchair bound person trying to manoeuvre through shops? I have already come across three business premises sporting signs saying the toilets on the premises are for the use of clients and patrons only, obviously a case of attack being the best form of defence.

I mentioned the closing of the facility at Ball Grove Leisure Park and that within less than three weeks following the closure human excrement was found outside the locked toilet. Somewhat ironic that last week end Ball Grove was the first public place to have volunteers cleaning up the area (I sincerely hope they were well protected against all health hazards).

£30,000 is being allocated to give Colne Market a facelift to attract more people into town. Surely it would cost a fraction of that sum to open the toilet at the bus station, the one down Albert Road and the facilities at Ball Grove Leisure Park. It would certainly be a great relief to people visiting.

Come on Colne, this is almost reverting back to the Victorian era when a man would walk the streets wearing a huge cloak to wrap round people, thus preserving their modesty, while he provided them with the facility of a pot.

Mr John Foster

Cotton Tree Lane