Police warn of Pokemon Go dangers

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It is the latest mobile phone craze – and it comes with a police warning.

Pokemon Go fever is gripping gamers across Lancashire to the exclusion, it seems, of almost everything else.

The game, which has been released this morning in the UK, is proving so addictive and distracting that the county’s constabulary have taken the unusual step of issuing guidelines to keep players safe.

Worried that youngsters will be so engrossed in what they are seeing on their mobiles that they might walk under a bus or fall into the clutches of criminals, officers have drawn up a five-point plan to avoid danger.

The advice includes letting family or friends know where you are going and what time you will be back, avoid potentially dangerous locations, respect the wishes of residents who might find their gardens have suddenly become infested with grotesque cartoon monsters, and, above all, stay alert to what is going on around you, especially when crossing the road.

For the uninitiated, Pokemon Go is described as a “free-to-play, location-based, augmented reality mobile game.”

Players use their phone’s GPS and camera to search for wild Pokemon which have been hidden in thousands of locations.

When they find them they can battle, capture and train them – all in the virtual world, not the real one.