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Clarets’ oldest fan Hartley dies aged 107

Hartley Eastwood pictured in 2009

Hartley Eastwood pictured in 2009

 

The Clarets’ oldest supporter Mr Hartley Eastwood has died at the grand old age of 107 years and five months.

The remarkable man, thought to have been one of the oldest people in the country, died just a day before his beloved Burnley kicked off their new Premier League campaign.

Hartley made his final visit to Turf Moor earlier this year when he was given a tour of the ground he had first visited decades before.

On his birthday in March, Hartley recounted his memories of watching the Clarets, including his recollection of a century ago of the day when Burnley lifted the FA Cup.

Hartley had been taken to Burnley town centre as a seven-year-old to see the trophy paraded through the streets on a horse-drawn carriage.

Born at 31 North Street in 1907, Hartley worked at John Gray’s weaving mill in Elm Street before working as a tackler at mills in Nelson.

Hartley, who was an ARP warden during the Second World War, didn’t marry until he was 54. His wife Muriel died some years ago.

His brother Harry was killed in an accident while managing a mill in Peru and he also had a sister, Agnes. He played football for Colne Road Wesleyan Sunday School and played cricket for local mill teams.

Hartley lived on his own in Moorland Drive until he was 100 when he moved to Dove Court Nursing Home.

His next-door neighbour of many years Mr Ron Cryer said: “Hartley was an absolute gentleman who still loved to listen to the Clarets on his radio.”

A spokesman for Burnley Football Club said: “Obviously we are deeply saddened to learn of Hartley’s death. Clearly, he was a devoted supporter and it is always a sad moment to lose one of the Clarets family. The thoughts of all at Burnley Football Club are with family and friends at this time.”

He leaves great niece Christine Marsden and great nephew John Edge. His funeral will be held on Tuesday, August 26th, at 10-40am at Burnley Crematorium.

 

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