Caring locals help change Bailey’s life

Clifford Heaton presents a cheque for �325 to Bobby Duckworth and his son Bailey (6) for a special 'Scoot' along with Dawn Hartley and Bob Duckworth at the Rosegrove Unity Working Mens Club.
Clifford Heaton presents a cheque for �325 to Bobby Duckworth and his son Bailey (6) for a special 'Scoot' along with Dawn Hartley and Bob Duckworth at the Rosegrove Unity Working Mens Club.

The new year will bring a new lease of life for little Bailey Duckworth – a kind-hearted gift means he’ll be able to play with his brothers for the first time in his life.

Bailey is six years old, but has not grown like other youngsters.

When he was born doctors were forced to remove half his brain to save his life. Two complex operations by the paediatric team at St Mary’s, Manchester, were needed and Bailey now spends most of his waking day in a special chair.

All that will change when Bailey gets his Scooot, thanks to members of Rosegrove Unity Club.

He will be able to play with McKenzie (8) and Ky (4) with his Scooot 3 in 1 mobility aid that will let him crawl, sit upright and also ride around the floor.

Bailey’s grandad, former Coal Clough House pub landlord Bob Duckworth, had asked if he could have a fund-raiser at the club, but the club went one better and presented Bailey’s dad, Bobby Duckworth, with a £325 cheque so he could buy the Scooot straight away.

“It was really good of them,” said Bob. “Bailey’s mum, Joanne, had told me about new products that could be therapeutic and educational for Bailey, and not having the money myself I was determined to try to raise the cash. My step-daughter, Dawn, works at the Unity and I asked her to approach the committee to see if they would, perhaps, put a couple of football cards around the club to bring in a few bob.

“God Bless them, I never expected what they did; they promptly offered to pay for the Scooot. The club said it is there to help local children in need, and that’s exactly what they have done. It was really nice of them.”

Mr Duckworth’s friends at Coal Clough House are also rallying to the cause.

He and his wife, Pat, ran the pub for 10 years until ill health forced them to leave. Mrs Duckworth was not well and he had been diagnosed with mouth cancer. They made a new life in Sabden, at Stubbins Vale, but Pat died six months later.

The pub’s current managers, Janice and Lorraine, launched an on-going appeal for Bailey to assist the family.

They recently moved from their home in Queensbury Road, Burnley, to Nelson, and intend to convert a garage into a therapy/bedroom and wet room.

Special lighting will complement the therapy he has at Reedley Development Centre.