Headteachers to take Pop Up Farm project to Uganda

Wellfield Primary School head Dawn Forshaw and St Leonard's Primary School head Julie Bradley with some of the Burnley football shirts that they will be taking to Uganda for the the local schools.

Wellfield Primary School head Dawn Forshaw and St Leonard's Primary School head Julie Bradley with some of the Burnley football shirts that they will be taking to Uganda for the the local schools.

0
Have your say

TWO headteachers from Burnley and Padiham are to take a revolutionary green project to impoverished schools in Uganda.

Dawn Forshaw, of Wellfield Primary School, and Julie Bradley, of St Leonard’s Primary School, will spread the principles of the Pop Up Farm project to the African country.

Thirty-five schools across the borough are involved in the project which looks at biodiversity, growing food and conserving water and energy.

The heads will make the 4,000-mile trip to work alongside colleagues in Uganda on new Pop Up projects in the formerly war-torn nation.

The trip will also give them the chance to see first-hand the impact of the Thoughtful Coffee Company, set up by Burnley children, using responsibly-sourced coffee from Uganda.

Mrs Forshaw and Mrs Bradley will set up a project in the town of Parabong, in the north of the country, to make a difference to the lives of children there.

Mrs Forshaw said: “It is all about putting the Pop Up Farm idea in a new context. We have seen huge benefits of Pop Up projects for children here. That is what we want to show them in Uganda.

“We will help establish gardens and farms for schools, similar to what we have done in Burnley.”

Seeds for Development is also involved in the trip, and the heads will be taking out drought-resistant seeds to get projects started.

Mrs Forshaw said: “The point is to bring together people from different cultural backgrounds and see what we can do together to improve things there. It is about shared expertise. It will focus on practical solutions.

“There is a huge drop-out rate in schools there. We need to find how can we help tailor what they teach to make it relevant for children. It is even more important than it is here. It is about improving the life opportunities and ambitions of the children.”

Hopes are that the links forged will be sustained between schools in Uganda and Burnley.

She added: “For our children, this is global citizenship in action. The school’s revenue is boosted through the sale of coffee.

“We want to meet the people who grow the coffee and see the impact our support will mean for the children.

“To be able to go out there and meet the teachers and see what’s happening will give our project in Burnley a really big boost.”

“We aim to get our children to think more deeply about other children in different parts of the world.”

They are also working with Burnley Football Club who have donated club shirts.