Drugged-up driver fell asleep when quizzed by police

File pic.
File pic.

A convicted supplier was so drugged-up he crashed into two cars while behind the wheel and then fell asleep as police were questioning him, a court heard.

Graham Farrer (60) had earlier been seen stumbling out of a house in Barnoldswick and a witness was so concerned she called the police.

Both she and officer who turned up had believed he was drunk, but a breath test was negative.

Burnley Crown Court was told the defendant, who has been breaking the law for 41 years, was caught with heroin and cannabis two months later.

He was subject to a suspended jail term for possessing Class A drugs with intent to supply at the time of the offences, but kept his freedom.

Farrer admitted driving while unfit through drugs and driving without due care and attention on March 10th and possessing drugs on June 25th. He had been committed to the higher court for sentence by magistrates sitting in Burnley.

Farrer, of Waddington Street, Earby, was given a 12 month community order, with a 20 day rehabilitation activity requirement and a six months drugs programme.

The defendant, who the court had earlier heard was on anti-psychotic medication, was banned for a year and was ordered to pay £150 criminal court costs.

Paul Cummings (prosecuting) said a number of people on South Avenue, Barnoldswick, wanted to move their vehicles but had been blocked in by the defendant. He was asked if he would move his car.

The prosecutor continued: “A witness saw the defendant come out of that house, stumbling from the address.

“He was unsteady on his feet, banged into the door frame as he left the address and he then banged into the garden wall. He appeared to be very confused.”

Mr Cummings said the witness thought Farrer was drunk, rang the police and saw him get into his car.

Farrer drove away and crashed very shortly after on North Parade. Police attended and could see he had hit two parked cars.

Mr Cummings said: “The defendant had got out and was sitting at the side of the road. He was bleeding from a wound to his eye.

“The officer also thought the defendant was drunk. He was clearly steady on his feet and had to be assisted into the police vehicle.

“His speech was slurred and in fact when he was spoken to he fell asleep.”

The prosecutor said the defendant tested negative for alcohol and blood was taken for a test. He was found to have drugs in his system.

Farrer had been given 20 months in prison, suspended for two years at the crown court in January. He had 39 offences on his record, which went back to 1973 and had served five years behind bars for wounding with intent.

Sentencing, Recorder Howard Bentham QC, told the defendant when he had read the case papers, he had been minded to send him to custody, but he had been persuaded that he should let the suspended sentence continue.

He warned Farrer: “If you come back in front of me, you are down the steps (to the cells). Keep your nose clean.”