Bricklayer blamed attack outside Burnley pub on steroids

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A BRICKLAYER who left a man he knew needing eight stitches after attacking him outside a pub, has been given a suspended jail sentence.

John Stevenson (29) later sent victim Lee Horne a text message, apologising and blaming his actions on steroids, a court had earlier heard.

Stevenson, of Padiham Road, Burnley, had admitted wounding on June 20th, at the town’s magistrates’ court and had been committed for sentence to Burnley Crown Court. At the higher court, Judge Andrew Woolman gave him nine months in jail, suspended for two years, with 150 hours unpaid work, 18 months supervision and a 60-day curfew, between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m.

The defendant, who has not been in trouble for 11 years, was also ordered to pay £2,500 compensation and £200 costs.

The justices had previously heard how Stevenson had set about the victim in an unprovoked assault outside the Tim Bobbin pub. He headbutted Mr Horne and then punched him in the face, knocking him to the ground. Mr Horne ended up covered in blood and while prone on the ground, the victim was kicked several times as he rolled up in a ball to protect himself. Mr Horne had to have eight stitches in his forehead and doctors also found a number of ligaments in his left leg and ankle were probably torn.

The hearing had been told how after the trouble, the defendant sent a text to his victim, telling him he did not know what to say and was really sorry.

The defendant claimed he had had it in his head Mr Horne was going to hit him. Stevenson said he had gone off the rails, had been on steroids and kept getting rages and paranoia. The defendant, who told the victim “I wish I could go back” added he was going to hand himself in and face up to what he had done.

On Stevenson’s behalf, the court had heard how he did not remember what happened. The offence had been committed around Fathers’ Day, which was a difficult time for the defendant, as his dad had committed suicide.

The court also heard that Stevenson had now cut out drugs and had referred himself for help.