Community farm throws open its gates

Employees, volunteers and guests during a tour during the open day at Pennine Lancashire Community Farm in March Street.
Employees, volunteers and guests during a tour during the open day at Pennine Lancashire Community Farm in March Street.

Pennine Lancashire Community Farm have hosted an open day where the charity invited people to come along and take a look at the site and what they do.

The charity, which is based in March Street, also held presentations for some of the clients that have completed various programmes the farm offers.

Andrew Williams is presented with his Step Program certificate by Lemora Priestley, chair of trustees of the Pennine Lancashire Community Farm in March Street.

Andrew Williams is presented with his Step Program certificate by Lemora Priestley, chair of trustees of the Pennine Lancashire Community Farm in March Street.

The project was set up to promote community cohesion and sustainable living by using outdoor spaces to bring people together.

Lenora Priestly, chairman of the board of trustees at the farm, says the day went well.

“A lot more people than expected turned up”, she said. “Not only did we invite people to come down and take a look at what we do, but we also held a small ceremony where we presented certificates to those that have completed our programmes.

“Some of these people may never have had a certificate in their lives before, and getting involved with something like this can make them feel more included within society.

We have one person that came into us with selective mutism, but after a while they began to talk and now they’re able to move forward in their life

Helen Clark, office co-ordinator

“We’re proud to say we have plenty of people that take advantage of the scheme and we also have volunteers from all backgrounds helping us out.”

The farm works by running specific projects which give individuals and family groups opportunity to grow their own produce on small manageable plots.

One of the projects that the charity runs is called the ‘Step Program’ which supports those at risk of isolation through eco therapy, training and enablement, and gardening services.

This year the charity worked with 52 individuals on this particular program, including adults with mental health difficulties, disabilities, unemployed and more.

Helen Clark, office co-ordinator explains the charity has many success stories.

She said: “We have one person that came into us with selective mutism, but after a while they began to talk and now they’re able to move forward in their life.”

If you’d like more information on the charity, you can visit their website at www.penninelancashirecommunityfarm.org.