‘Living Wage’ pledge from growing firm

What More

What More

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A fast growing East Lancashire company has made a commitment that none of its employees will receive less than the UK Living Wage.

What More UK Ltd employs around 220 people at its state-of-the-art manufacturing and distribution centre at the Altham Business Park, where it produces the household name ‘Wham’ brand of plastic storage, houseware and garden products.

The majority of its employees earn more than the Living Wage – currently £7.85 per hour – and from this week no-one employed by the company will earn less. A number of employees saw an increase in their pay packets as the company committed to the Living Wage as its minimum level of reward.

The Living Wage is an hourly rate set independently, calculated according to the basic cost of living in the UK and updated annually.

Currently set at £7.85 per hour (outside London), it is significantly higher than the National Minimum Wage of £6.50 per hour, making a real difference to a weekly or monthly pay packet. Many leading companies, including Nestle, HSBC, Ikea, Google, Barclays and ITV, now commit to paying the Living Wage as their bottom line.

Tony Grimshaw, Director of What More UK Ltd, said: “We realise our employees are our biggest asset, helping take us from humble beginnings in 1999 to a company with more than 650 superior products, a turnover of £47m. and exporting to 63 countries worldwide in just 16 years. It’s only right we share our success with our hard working colleagues at every level.

We realise our employees are our biggest asset, helping take us from humble beginnings in 1999 to a company with more than 650 superior products, a turnover of £47m. and exporting to 63 countries worldwide

Tony Grimshaw, Director of What More UK Ltd

“Of course there are many jobs within the company that pay well above the Living Wage, but we are proud to commit to it as our absolute minimum. Even new colleagues will achieve this pay level after a very short initial induction and training period.”

Launched in 2001, the Living Wage campaign has gained momentum through the harsh economic times of recent years, independent research showing that it benefits employers and employees alike, as well as wider society.