Burnley stands together with the people of Manchester

Residents stood together in solidarity this evening to offer support to the victims and their families of the attack on Manchester Arena.

Refusing to let the town's multicultural communities crumble as a result of fear and mistrust, Ian Lofthouse, working with Burnley Council, led a peace vigil at the memorial garden outside Burnley Central Library.

Flowers were laid at the Peace Gardens

Flowers were laid at the Peace Gardens

"I'm a grandfather and it could have been my grandchildren there," said Ian. "My daughter and grandchild live near the MEN and their school was closed today."

Paying their respects to the victims and their families, residents lit candles, laid flowers and noted a minute's silence.

Coinciding with the vigil at Albert Square, Manchester, the evening offered people the chance to send their thoughts and prayers to the city.

"What's happening in this world we live in is sickening," Ian added. "In Burnley we're multicultural but [the attack] shows how much hatred there is in the world."

Candles were let in remembrance

Candles were let in remembrance

The vigil, however, called for togetherness among residents, welcoming people of all faiths to unite in prayer against terrorism.

"I get on with everyone," Ian said. "I have lots of friends of different faiths, who are all disgusted by what's happened. It doesn't help to blame one group of people."

"On Remembrance Day, it was great to see boys and girls of different faiths at a memorial service and that's what we wanted to recreate at the vigil."

The peace gardens fell silent for one minute

The peace gardens fell silent for one minute